Calendar

Calendar

Nov
7
Fri
Copper Opening Day!
Nov 7 2014 – Nov 7 2015 all-day

Ain’t nothing going to hold us back! Come to Copper Mountain on November 7th and let’s celebrate the season! Click here for more information!  

Sep
5
Sat
Jazz Aspen Snowmass No Doubt Jimmy Cliff & Grupo Fantasma @ Snowmass Town Park
Sep 5 @ 3:00 pm

Jazz Aspen Snowmass No Doubt Jimmy Cliff & Grupo Fantasma

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No Doubt Artist Biography by John Bush

With the return of the punks in the mid-’90s came a resurgence of their slightly more commercial rivals, new wave bands. No Doubt found a niche as a new wave/ska band, on the strength of vocalist Gwen Stefani’s persona — alternately an embrace of little-girl-lost innocence and riot grrrl feminism — exemplified on the band’s break-out single, “Just a Girl.”

Formed in early 1987 as a ska band inspired by Madness, the lineup of No Doubt initially comprised John Spence, Gwen Stefani, and her brother Eric. While playing the party-band circuit around Anaheim, the trio picked up bassist Tony Kanal, born in India but raised in Great Britain and the U.S. Hardened by the suicide of Spence in December 1987, No Doubt nevertheless continued; Gwen became the lone vocalist and the group added guitarist Tom Dumont and drummer Adrian Young.

The Beacon Street Collection
No Doubt’s live act began to attract regional interest, and Interscope Records signed them in 1991. The band’s debut a year later, an odd fusion of ’80s pop and ska, sank without a trace in the wake of the grunge movement. As a result, Interscope refused to support No Doubt’s tour or further recordings. The band responded by recording on their own during 1993-1994; the result was the self-released Beacon Street Collection, much rawer and more punk-inspired than the debut. Eric Stefani left just after its release, later working as an animator for The Simpsons.

Tragic Kingdom
By late 1994, Interscope allowed recordings to resume, and Tragic Kingdom was released in October 1995. The album served as a document of the breakup of Gwen Stefani and Kanal, whose relationship had lasted seven years. Thanks to constant touring and the appearance of “Just a Girl” and “Spiderwebs” on MTV’s Buzz Bin, the album hit the Top Ten in 1996. Stefani, who has made no secret of her pop ambitions, became a centerpiece of attention as an alternative to the crop of tough girls prevalent on the charts. By the end of the year, Tragic Kingdom hit number one on the album charts, almost a year after its first release; the record’s third single, the ballad “Don’t Speak,” was the band’s biggest hit to date.

Return of Saturn
No Doubt’s much-anticipated follow-up, The Return of Saturn, was released in the spring of 2000, and “Simple Kind of Life” and “Ex-Girlfriend” were both critically successful at the mainstream and college levels. A year later, Stefani also hooked up with rap chanteuse Eve for the single “Let Me Blow Your Mind” (it went on to earn a Grammy for Best Rap/Sung Collaboration in 2002); however, Stefani also joined her band for the release of their fifth album. The ska revival and new wave sounds of Rock Steady were issued hot on the heels of debut single “Hey Baby” in December 2001.

The Singles 1992-2003
Rock Steady generated several major hits — the heavy synths of “Hella Good” and the seductive reggae of “Underneath It All” being the biggest — and the group continued touring the record over the next couple of years, all leading to the release of the hits collection The Singles 1992-2003 in 2003. The following year the band took a hiatus of undetermined length as Stefani launched a solo career with 2004’s Love.Angel.Music.Baby. This hiatus wound up lasting the better part of a decade, during which Stefani stayed in the spotlight via two hit solo albums (the second, The Sweet Escape, arriving in 2006), while the other bandmembers pursued other projects, the most prominent being Tony Kanal’s collaborations with P!nk in 2008. No Doubt eased back into action in 2009 with a reunion tour accompanied by the announcement of an impending new album. That new record took a while to complete, but it was finally finished in 2012, and released as Push and Shove that fall. It was preceded by the single “Settle Down.”

Jimmy Cliff Artist Biography by Jo-Ann Greene 

It’s one of the music industry’s great ironies that today, outside of reggae circles, Jimmy Cliff is perhaps better known for his film appearances than his music. Even after a string of hits, the singer never quite managed to break into the mainstream, although he seemed poised for international stardom during the late ’60s/early ’70s. The singer was born in St. Catherine, Jamaica, on April 1, 1948, with the less prosaic name James Chambers. His talent was evident from childhood, and he began his career appearing at local shows and parish fairs. Feeling ready for the big time at the age of 14, he moved to Kingston and took the surname Cliff to express the heights he intended on reaching. Cliff recorded two unsuccessful singles before he was spotted by Derrick Morgan, who brought him to Leslie Kong. His first single for the budding producer, “Hurricane Hattie,” was an instant hit. Unusually, Cliff remained with Kong until the producer’s death; most Jamaican artists flit from studio to studio. The singer’s loyalty was rewarded, however, by a string of follow-up hits. In the early years, the pair helped set the ska scene alight, both in Jamaica and in Britain, where the singer’s singles were picked up by Island Records. “Miss Jamaica,” “King of Kings,” “One Eyed Jacks,” and “Pride and Passion” have since become classics of the original ska era.

By 1964, Cliff‘s star was so bright that he was selected as one of Jamaica’s representatives at the World’s Fair. A successful residency in Paris followed, and Island head Chris Blackwell eventually convinced the singer to relocate to Britain. The label itself was in the process of shifting away from Jamaican music and into progressive rock, and thus Cliff began composing songs with an eye to cross over into that market.

It was a risky plan, but ultimately a successful one. In 1968,Cliff released his debut album, the excellent Hard Road, and won the International Song Festival with “Waterfall,” a song that became a smash hit in Brazil. He swiftly moved to that country to take advantage of his success, but even greater heights were in the offing. The following year, “Wonderful World, Beautiful People” proved to be his international breakthrough. The single soared to number six on the British charts, and charmed its way into the Top 25 in the States. The song’s anti-war follow-up, “Vietnam,” proved to be less popular, even if Bob Dylan called it the best protest song he’d ever heard. Regardless, Cliff‘s new album, 1969’s Wonderful World, was critically acclaimed, and saw the singer starting to build a following amongst the AOR crowd.

The title track, a cover of Cat Steven‘s “Wild World,” was another smash in 1970, and Desmond Dekker took Cliff‘s own “You Can Get It if You Really Want” to number two in Britain. And then tragedy struck. Leslie Kong, who had continued to oversee Cliff‘s career during this entire period, died unexpectedly of a heart attack in August 1971. The singer was at a loss, as he’d grown up under the producer’s wing and was abruptly forced to fend for himself. Another Cycle, which arrived later that year, was proof that Cliff was beginning to get his career back on track. One of the last projects Kong had undertaken was overseeing the soundtrack to the movie The Harder They Come. Produced and written by Perry Henzell, this powerful film featured Cliff in the leading role, and upon its release swiftly became an underground classic. The soundtrack, which boasted a clutch of Cliff‘s own compositions, was an equally seminal record.

This should have pushed the singer into the mainstream, but Island dropped the ball and turned their attention to Bob Marley instead. The timing was also off in the U.S., where the movie didn’t see release until 1975. Cliff left Island’s roster and signed to Reprise in the U.S. and EMI in the U.K., but fared no better on either label. 1973’s Unlimited, 1974’sStruggling Man, and the following year’s Brave Warrior were unable to sustain the success of Another Cycle, never mind improve upon it. During this time, Cliff converted to Islam and traveled to Africa in search of his roots, and his newfound religious devotion began to heavily influence his music. In 1975, with the release of The Harder They Come in the U.S., Cliff‘s second album for the year, Follow My Mind, immediately grabbed America’s attention and became his first album to reach into the bottom of the chart. Reprise then decided it was time for a greatest-hits collection, although this would be accomplished via a live album. Rolling Stones‘ producer Andrew Loog Oldham was brought in to oversee the project, and Cliff was sent out on the road to tour and record. What the label received was one of Cliff‘s most ferocious albums to date, Live: In Concert. The singer was not ready to wallow in nostalgia, and throughout the rest of the decade he continued releasing albums that were thoroughly modern in sound and fierce in delivery.

Cliff ended his relationship with Reprise in the new decade with 1981’s “Give the People What They Want, and moved to Columbia. He formed a new backing band, Oneness, and embarked on a tour of the U.S. with Peter Tosh; there was also a fabulous performance at Reggae Sunsplash that year. 1983’s The Power and the Glory inaugurated his partnership with Kool & the Gang, and the album was nominated for a Grammy. Its follow-up, Cliff Hanger, would win the award in 1985. However, 1989’s Hanging Fire became his last effort for Columbia, although the singer continued to release material in both Jamaica and the U.K. During this period, Cliffalso co-starred in the movie Club Paradise. He returned to the American charts in 1993 with his cover of “I Can See Clearly Now,” from the soundtrack for Cool Runnings, which glided into the Top 20. More singles and albums followed, and the singer remained a potent musical force. A comeback album of sorts, Black Magic, which featured duets with high profile stars like Sting, Joe Strummer, Wyclef Jeanand others, appeared from Artemis Records in 2004. In 2012 he partnered with Rancid frontman Tim Armstrong for Rebirth, a nostalgic return to form.

Sep
6
Sun
Jazz Aspen Snowmass Lenny Kravitz The Fray & Conrad Sewell @ Snowmass Town Park
Sep 6 @ 3:00 pm

Jazz Aspen Snowmass Lenny Kravitz The Fray & Conrad Sewell

Jazz Aspen Snowmass Lenny Kravitz

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Lenny Kravitz Artist Biography by Greg Prato

Rock music in the 1980s had completely lost the gritty feel of earlier eras, until Lenny Kravitz rediscovered the magic formula. Kravitz‘s sonic template combined good old-fashioned rock & roll with glam, soul, and psychedelia, making him a massive success. He made a splash straight out of the gate with his album Let Love Rule. After that, he de-emphasized the flower-power aspects of his music and began moving toward a heavier rock sound. This progression brought him such huge hits as “Are You Gonna Go My Way” and a hard-rocking cover of the Guess Who‘s “American Woman.” Along the way, his flamboyant image, model-like looks, and frequent acting roles made him a fixture in pop-music circles.

Born in New York on May 26, 1964 (his mother was actress Roxie Roker, best known for her role as Helen Willis on the popular TV series The Jeffersons, and his father was a TV producer), Kravitz was raised in Los Angeles, where he found himself around countless musical giants as a youngster due to his parents’ friendships with the likes of Duke Ellington, Sarah Vaughan, Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald,Bobby Short, and Miles Davis. Kravitz was a member of the California Boys Choir until his teenage years, when he decided to pursue rock & roll while in high school and under the heavily influence of funk-rocker Prince. Kravitz‘s admiration of the Purple One was so great that he at first patterned his style and approach directly after Prince and became known as “Romeo Blue” (complete with blue contact lenses), but failed to land a recording contract.

In the late ’80s, Kravitz relocated back to New York City, where one of his roommates turned out to be actress Lisa Bonet (who played the part of Denise Huxtable on The Cosby Show); they eventually got married. During this time, Kravitz wisely discarded his Prince-like approach and looked back to such ’60s/’70s classic rockers as Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Wonder, Curtis Mayfield, Bob Marley, and the Beatles for inspiration. Kravitz found a kindred spirit in engineer Henry Hirsch (who would stick by Kravitz throughout his career). With a back-to-basics approach, his style was quite refreshing in the humorously gaudy late ’80s. He inked a recording contract with Virgin Records and issued his debut release, Let Love Rule, in 1989. Kravitz‘s debut proved to be a surprise hit due to the success of the title track, which became a hit single and oft-aired video. A few critics were quick to assume thatKravitz‘s retro look and sound were simply a schtick to get the public’s attention, but come the ’90s, it had become integrated into the mainstream (both musically and fashion-wise), proving that Kravitzwas a bit of a trendsetter. It was around this time that Kravitz penned a major hit single, not for himself but for Madonna, who went to number one with the sultry track “Justify My Love.”

What should have been a time of happiness for Kravitzquickly turned sour as he and Bonet divorced in the early ’90s. Kravitz‘s heartbreak was very evident in his sophomore effort, Mama Said, which was even stronger than its predecessor, highlighted by the Led Zep-like funk-rocker “Always on the Run” (a collaboration with Guns N’ Rosesguitarist Slash), as well as a mega-hit with the Curtis Mayfield-esque soul ballad “It Ain’t Over ‘Til It’s Over,” which confirmed that Kravitz‘s success was no fluke. But the best was yet to come for Kravitz. His third release overall, 1993’s Are You Gonna Go My Way, is often considered to be the finest album front to back of his entire career, and with good reason: every single song was a winner, including the uptempo, anthemic title track, which turned out to be one of MTV’s most-played videos for that year. The album was a massive hit and Kravitz became an arena headliner stateside, as well as being featured on countless magazine covers.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjVQ36NhbMk

Despite an almost two-year gap between albums, Kravitz‘s fourth release, Circus, came off sounding unfocused and was a major letdown compared to his stellar previous few releases. Perhaps sensing that he needed to stir things up musically, Kravitz dabbled with electronics and trip-hop loops for his next album, 1998’s 5. Although not a huge hit right off the bat, the album proved to have an incredibly long chart life, spawning the biggest hit of Kravitz‘s career, “Fly Away,” almost a year after its original release. With the single’s success, Virgin decided to cash in on the album’s sudden rebirth by reissuing it around the same time with a pair of extra added bonus tracks, one of which became another sizable hit single, a remake of the Guess Who‘s “American Woman” (which was used in the hit 1999 comedy movie Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me). Kravitz‘s first best-of set, the 15-track Greatest Hits, was issued as a stopgap release in 2000, while his sixth studio release overall, Lenny, was issued a year later. Baptismfollowed in 2004. After starting a residential, commercial, and product design company called Kravitz Design, he recorded a funky version of John Lennon‘s “Cold Turkey” for Amnesty International’s 2007 benefit compilation Instant Karma. Before the end of the year it was announced that Kravitz would return in 2008 with a new album, It Is Time for a Love Revolution. The album arrived in February, accompanied by a brief tour.

Kravitz made his acting debut in the Academy Award-nominated 2009 film Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire. As he was filming his next role — a spot in the eagerly awaited adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games — he released his ninth album, Black and White America, in the summer of 2011. Reprising his role of Cinna in the second of The Hunger Games movies in 2013, Kravitzwouldn’t return to the studio until the following year. Kravitz released his tenth studio album, Strut, in September of 2014; it was preceded by the disco-rock single “The Chamber.”

Sep
7
Mon
Garfield County offices closed – Labor Day @ All locations except Sheriff's patrol and emergency functions
Sep 7 all-day

All county offices of elected officials and county administrative departments will be closed Monday, September 7.

Staff functions which serve the community in emergency or 24-hour capacities will remain in operation as needed, however administrative offices of such departments will be closed.

Garfield County holiday closures

Labor Day – All libraries closed
Sep 7 all-day

Labor Day

Sep
8
Tue
Board of County Commissioners meeting
Sep 8 @ 8:00 am – 8:00 am

Agendas for the Garfield County Board of County Commission meetings are posted online here.

Pitkin County Board of Commissioners Work Session @ Plaza 1 Meeting Room
Sep 8 @ 3:30 pm – 11:00 pm

Pitkin County Board of Commissioners Work Session http://www.pitkincounty.com/calendar.aspx?EID=73

Free Suicide Awareness Class
Sep 8 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Learn about warning signs and how you can help prevent suicide. Learn what to do, what to say, and where to turn for help. Attend free suicide awareness trainings throughout Garfield and Pitkin counties in September.

http://www.garfield-county.com/public-health/suicide-prevention-coalition.aspx

970-945-6614, ext. 2011

Sep
9
Wed
Foreclosure sale
Sep 9 @ 10:00 am – 10:00 am
“Putting Your Garden to Bed” workshop, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m., Buffalo Mt. room, County Commons, Frisco
Sep 9 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Come to the Free Master Gardener Workshop, "Putting Your Garden to bed" on Wednesday, September 9, 2015 from 5:30 p.m. -m 7:30 p.m. in the Buffalo Mtn. Room at the County Commons, Frisco at 0037 Peak One Drive.