Calendar

Calendar

Sep
5
Sat
Steamboat Stage Race @ Steamboat Springs
Sep 5 – Sep 7 all-day

The 7th annual Steamboat Stage Race, presented by Moots, welcomes racers from across Colorado to compete in three days of road racing with stages including a time trial, road race and criterium.

Stage Race

More information at bikesteamboat.com.

Farmers Market @ Steamboat Springs
Sep 5 @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Steamboat Farmers Market is now in its 11th year, now located at the intersection of 7th and Yampa Street.  The market was moved to it new location in 2014 and has proven very successful for both vendors and shoppers with more than 80 booths, featuring local and regional foods and products.

The Market includes fresh produce, meats, cheese, baked goods, canned and prepared foods, plants and other consumables.  In addition, there is a limited number of handcrafted-by-the-vendor arts and crafts as well as several non-profit organizations participating.

Vendor registration for the market opens on January 15, 2015.  To register as a vendor, go to www.ManageMyMarket.com

 

The Market is held, rain or shine from 9am to 2 pm, every Saturday from June 13 to September 19, 2015. The Markets new location is at  7th Street and Yampa Street, near the river, in downtown Steamboat Springs.

For more information, email: [email protected] or call 970-846-1800.

Sep
6
Sun
Chili Challenge @ Steamboat Springs
Sep 6 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

Chili competitors vie for honors in the red, green, other, cornbread and salsa categories.

Live music, beer and sodas, and children’s activities are available. Enter your favorite chili recipe or vote for the coveted People’s Choice Award in the 11th Annual Downtown Chili Challenge. The fun takes place on Sunday of Labor Day Weekend, downtown on the corner of 7th and Yampa streets. Join the fun, listen to live country music, and have a beer.

For questions, contact Tracy Barnett at (970) 846-1800. Visit mainstreetsteamboat.com for more details on this event and how to enter.

Sep
12
Sat
Farmers Market @ Steamboat Springs
Sep 12 @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Steamboat Farmers Market is now in its 11th year, now located at the intersection of 7th and Yampa Street.  The market was moved to it new location in 2014 and has proven very successful for both vendors and shoppers with more than 80 booths, featuring local and regional foods and products.

The Market includes fresh produce, meats, cheese, baked goods, canned and prepared foods, plants and other consumables.  In addition, there is a limited number of handcrafted-by-the-vendor arts and crafts as well as several non-profit organizations participating.

Vendor registration for the market opens on January 15, 2015.  To register as a vendor, go to www.ManageMyMarket.com

 

The Market is held, rain or shine from 9am to 2 pm, every Saturday from June 13 to September 19, 2015. The Markets new location is at  7th Street and Yampa Street, near the river, in downtown Steamboat Springs.

For more information, email: [email protected] or call 970-846-1800.

Sep
16
Wed
Counting Crows Red Rocks 2015 with Citizen Cope & Hollis Brown @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre
Sep 16 @ 5:30 pm

Counting Crows Red Rocks 2015 with Citizen Cope & Hollis Brown

AMTCONCERTCAL200

Counting Crows Artist Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

With their angst-filled hybrid of Van Morrison, the Band, andR.E.M., Counting Crows became an overnight sensation in 1994. Only a year earlier, the band was a group of unknown musicians, filling in for the absent Van Morrison at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony; they were introduced by an enthusiastic Robbie Robertson. Early in 1993, the band recorded its debut album, August and Everything After, withT-Bone Burnett. Released in the fall, it was a dark and somber record, driven by the morose lyrics and expressive vocals of Adam Duritz. The only uptempo song, “Mr. Jones,” became their ticket to stardom, and Counting Crows enjoyed a significant amount of success throughout the ’90s and beyond.
What made Counting Crows unique was how they were able to balance Duritz‘s tortured lyrics with the sound of the late ’60s and early ’70s; it made them one of the few alternative bands to appeal to listeners who thought that rock & roll died in 1972. Recovering the Satellites followed in 1996, and “A Long December” was a Top Ten hit on both the Modern Rock and Adult Top 40 charts. The band issued the two-discAcross a Wire: Live in New York in 1998, and the following year saw the release of Counting Crows‘ third studio album,This Desert Life. In the midst of recording and collaborating with Ryan Adams on his sophomore album, Gold, Duritzjoined his band in the studio as well. The fruit of those sessions was the group’s Steve Lillywhite-produced fourth album, Hard Candy.

The next year saw the release of the best-of Films About Ghosts, and in 2004 Counting Crows reminded fans of their ability to write a hit single with “Accidentally in Love,” which appeared on the Shrek 2 soundtrack. Two years later, New Amsterdam: Live at Heineken Music Hall, recorded from a show on February 6, 2003, was made available to the public. In 2008 the band issued Saturday Nights and Sunday Mornings, a concept record divided into two halves: the more rowdy, upbeat rock of Saturday night soundtracks and the mellow alt-country side of Sunday morning hangovers.

In 2009 the band parted ways with its longtime major-label home Geffen Records, but continued to tour and write new material as feverishly as ever. Duritz struggled with mental problems and prescription drug addiction following the split with Geffen, working on solo material that he released in part online.August and Everything After: Live at Town Hall, the band’s third official live album, was released in 2011. To tide fans over until the release of an album of new material, the band offered up a collection of cover songs entitled Underwater Sunshine (Or What We Did on Our Summer Vacation) in 2012 and yet another live album, Echoes of the Outlaw Roadshow, the following year. While touring in 2013 the group started to write material for what would become its seventh album. Recorded at the end of 2013 with producer Brian Deck, Somewhere Under Wonderland saw release in September 2014.

Citizen Cope

 

Sep
18
Fri
Steamboat OktoberWest: Suds & Grub @ Downtown Steamboat Springs
Sep 18 @ 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm

7th Annual OktoberWest®, a mountain town twist on Octoberfest, kicks off on Friday with Suds N Grub. Head downtown and stroll to participating restaurants to taste a variety of seasonal and local beers and enjoy delicious food specials.

The Suds N Grub Stroll takes patrons on a tour down main street and along the beautiful Yampa River to mingle, nibble, and sample draft beers at a variety of local restaurants. Each Stroll stop presents a different selection of beers, allowing patrons to acquaint themselves with the variety of charming establishments that Steamboat has to offer.

Suds N Grub

OktoberWest glass tasting mugs with 10 tasting tokens will be available for $15. Tokens without at tasting mug will also be available; 5 tokens for $5, or $1 each. Come to the pre party to pick up your tasting mug, a map of participating restaurants and a full list of beers and culinary treats offered.

 This event is a fundraiser for the Young Professionals Network.

MORE ON OKTOBERWEST

 

Sep
19
Sat
Farmers Market @ Steamboat Springs
Sep 19 @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Steamboat Farmers Market is now in its 11th year, now located at the intersection of 7th and Yampa Street.  The market was moved to it new location in 2014 and has proven very successful for both vendors and shoppers with more than 80 booths, featuring local and regional foods and products.

The Market includes fresh produce, meats, cheese, baked goods, canned and prepared foods, plants and other consumables.  In addition, there is a limited number of handcrafted-by-the-vendor arts and crafts as well as several non-profit organizations participating.

Vendor registration for the market opens on January 15, 2015.  To register as a vendor, go to www.ManageMyMarket.com

 

The Market is held, rain or shine from 9am to 2 pm, every Saturday from June 13 to September 19, 2015. The Markets new location is at  7th Street and Yampa Street, near the river, in downtown Steamboat Springs.

For more information, email: [email protected] or call 970-846-1800.

Grace Potter Red Rocks 2015 @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre
Sep 19 @ 5:30 pm

Grace Potter Red Rocks 2015 with special guest Galactic

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AEG Live is excited to announce GRACE POTTER live at Red Rocks Amphitheatre Saturday, September 19, 2015.

PURCHASE TICKETS

About her first solo album, Grace Potter said: “Everything about this record has been a wild, wonderful odyssey. I explore new sounds with each album I write, and this time around I learned to be patient and really allow each song to boil down to its most universal form. Eric Valentine’s studio has a creative atmosphere that allows an artist to chase down every crazy idea, while producing some of the most exciting, high quality sounds I’ve ever heard. It’s been a life-changing experience and I can’t wait to take my live show even deeper and dive into old and new songs!”

PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT WWW.AXS.COM OR CHARGE TICKETS BY PHONE, CALL 888.929.7849.

Tickets to this show are available at the box office of the Denver Coliseum from 11 am – 3 pm every Saturday.

General Admission and Reserved tickets are $42.50 – $47.50 plus applicable service charges.  All ages are welcome.

Artist Biography by Marisa Brown

Born in Waitsfield, Vermont, Grace Potter grew up in a family that encouraged her artistic pursuits in areas from music to theater, the latter of which she was studying at St. Lawrence University when drummer Matt Burr heard her singing at an open-mike night in 2002 and asked if she would form a band with him. She declined, but when her high school friend and bass player Courtright Beard enrolled in their college, she reconsidered the invitation, and the three of them began to write and perform jazz-influenced songs, with Potter also taking up duties on the Hammond B-3. Soon, guitarist Scott Tournet joined, and the bandmembers, calling themselves Grace Potter & the Nocturnals — thanks to their late-night practice habits — began to think seriously about making music their careers. When Burr graduated in 2003, they decided to move back to Vermont to some land that Potter‘s parents owned and dedicate themselves more fully to their craft, replacing Beard (who chose to stay at school) with Bryan Dondero in the process.

In 2004 they self-released their debut, Original Soul, receiving positive response and comparisons to artists like Norah Jones and early Bonnie Raitt. This in turn garnered major-label offers, but the band preferred to build its fan base by constant touring and festival appearances. Word of their electric performance spread, and shortly after their second album, Nothing But the Water — also self-released — came out in 2005, Grace Potter & the Nocturnals signed to Hollywood Records., Their third full-length, This Is Somewhere, hit shelves nationwide in August 2007. In 2010, Grace Potter & the Nocturnals was released; Hollywood pulled out all the stops in order to break the band internationally. Over the next year and a half, they toured incessantly, releasing a four-song Christmas EP, a live album in the UK, and a digital download-only set recorded live at the Fillmore. Potter‘s duet with Kenny Chesney, “You and Tequila,” was nominated for Single of the Year Vocal Collaboration at the American Country Awards, and the pair performed it at the CMA Awards. In June of 2012, a new studio album, The Lion the Beast the Beat, by Grace Potter & the Nocturnals was released. Peaking at 17 on the Billboard 200, The Lion the Beast the Beat received the most attention of any Nocturnals record yet released, but Potter decided to go solo for her next album, 2015’s Midnight. Produced by Eric Valentine, who also co-wrote many of the songs, the album appeared in August of 2015
Sep
23
Wed
MARK KNOPFLER RED ROCKS @ Red Rocks Ampitheatre
Sep 23 @ 7:30 pm

MARK KNOPFLER RED ROCKS SEPTEMBER 23RD, 2015

The most celebrated British guitar hero to emerge in the 1970s and ’80s, Mark Knopfler rose to fame as the leader of Dire Straits, and his songwriting and incisive guitar work played a decisive role in making them an international success story. At a time when punk and new wave were making technique for its own sake seem irrelevant, and metal was taking the guitar solo in noisier and unpredictable directions, Knopfler‘s clean but dexterous picking proved there was still room for traditionalism and chops in mainstream rock & roll. But even without considering Dire Straits, Knopfler has accumulated an impressive résumé as a producer, sideman, songwriter, and film composer, working alongside some of the best and best-known figures in the music business.

Mark Freuder Knopfler was born in Glasgow, Scotland on August 12, 1949. His father, a Hungarian émigré, worked as an architect, while his mother, of English heritage, was a schoolteacher. The Knopfler family moved to England when Mark was seven years of age, settling in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, and he developed a passion for music while spending time with his uncle; as he told journalist Dan Forte, “I heard my Uncle Kingsley playing boogie-woogie on the piano when I was about eight or nine, and I thought that those three chords were the most magnificent things in the world — still do.” A few years later, Knopfler began learning to play guitar, first on an inexpensive Hofner model before moving up to a Fender electric his father bought for him. At 16, Knopfler and some pals cut a demo single that was never released, and he performed in a vocal group that was successful enough to merit an appearance on local television.

In 1967, Knopfler enrolled at Harlow Technical College, where he studied journalism, and a year later he landed a job at the Yorkshire Evening Post, where he wrote news stories and music criticism. After two years at the Post, Knopfler opted to return to school, studying English at Leeds University. While at Leeds, he became friends with a fellow guitarist named Steve Phillips, and they began playing out under the name the Duolian String Pickers; while working with Phillips, Knopfler began developing the finger-picking style that would become his trademark.

After graduating from Leeds in 1973, Knopfler moved to London, and joined a pub rock band called Brewer’s Droop, featuring drummer Pick Withers. Knopfler‘s tenure with the band was short-lived, and he took a position as a lecturer at Essex’s Loughton College. Knopfler became friends with a handful of local musicians, and they formed a new band called the Café Racers. Mark‘s brother, David Knopfler, who was also a guitarist and songwriter, introduced Mark to a fellow musician, John Illsley, who played guitar but was also a solid bassist. When the Café Racers found themselves in need of a bass player one night, Mark asked Illsley to sit in, and before long, Mark, David, and John were sharing an apartment and working on songs, with Mark on lead guitar, David on rhythm, and John on bass. Mark invited Pick Withers to play drums with the new combo, and while they played their first few gigs as the Café Racers, before long they adopted a new name coined by WithersDire Straits.

After cutting a demo tape, Dire Straits found a champion in BBC disk jockey Charlie Gillett, who began playing their demo on his show, attracting the attention of manager Ed Bicknell and Polygram A&R man John Stainze. Bicknell took Dire Straits under his wing and Stainze signed the group to Polygram’s progressive and hard rock subsidiary Vertigo Records; Warner Bros picked up the band for the United States. Dire Straits‘ self-titled debut album was released in the fall of 1978, and the song “Sultans of Swing” became a surprise hit single in both America and the U.K., with the album following it into the charts, as the group’s clean, expert playing, and Knopfler‘s deft lead guitars, Dylan-esque vocals, and evocative songs won the band airplay on pop and classic rock playlists. It was the first of a long string of successes for Dire Straits, and while the lineup would shift frequently over the group’s lifespan — Mark Knopfler and John Illsley would prove to be the group’s only constants — between 1978 and 1995 the group was a top concert draw and a frequent presence on radio and record charts; their landmark 1985 album Brothers in Arms sold over nine million copies in the United States alone, and was the top selling CD of the ’80s in the U.K.

Slow Train Coming

It wasn’t long after Dire Straits made their commercial breakthrough that Knopfler began expanding his creative boundaries. In 1979, he was invited to play lead guitar on Bob Dylan‘s album Slow Train Coming, and in 1983, he produced Dylan‘s Infidels, as well as leading the backing band. In addition to producing much of Dire Straits‘ catalog, Knopfler was behind the controls for albums by Aztec Camera, Randy Newman, and Willy DeVille. Knopfler lent his talents as a session guitarist to an impressive and diverse range of artists, including Van Morrison, Phil Lynott, Steely Dan, Kate & Anna McGarrigle, Cliff Richard, and Scott Walker. He also penned the song “Private Dancer” for Tina Turner‘s triumphant comeback album of the same name, and found his songs being covered by the Shadows, whose legendary guitarist Hank Marvin was one of Knopfler‘s first inspirations. In 1983, Knopfler added “film composer” to his résumé when he wrote the score for the Scottish comedy Local Hero; Knopfler‘s music was cited in many of the film’s rave reviews, and he would later score the films Cal, The Princess Bride, Last Exit to Brooklyn, and Wag the Dog, among others. And when Weird Al Yankovic asked Knopfler‘s permission to record a parody of Dire Straits‘ “Money for Nothing” for the soundtrack to his film UHF, Knopfler agreed under one condition — that he be allowed to re-create his guitar parts for Yankovic‘s version. Weird Al happily acceded to Knopfler‘s request.

Neck and Neck

After Knopfler made guest appearances on several albums by another of his heroes, Nashville icon Chet Atkins, the two cut a collaborative project in 1990, called Neck & Neck, which was the first non-soundtrack album Knopfler released under his own name. Knopfler also showed off his love of country sounds with his side project, the Notting Hillbillies, which featured Brendan Croker, Guy Fletcher, and Mark‘s old Duolian String Pickers partner Steve Phillips. In the fall of 1992, Dire Straits played their last concert, a show in Spain on the tour in support of On Every Street, and in 1995, Knopfler quietly announced that he’d retired the band, feeling they’d become too big. 1996’s Golden Heart became Knopfler‘s official solo debut, followed in 2000 by Sailing to Philadelphia, which included guest appearances by Van Morrison, James Taylor, Gillian Welch, and Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford of Squeeze. The newly prolific Knopfler shortly returned to the studio and released The Ragpicker’s Dream in the fall of 2002; a world tour was planned, but after Knopfler was involved in a motorcycle accident that left him with a broken shoulder and collarbone, the dates were canceled. However, he was soon feeling well enough to go back to recording, and issued Shangri-La in 2004, a set recorded at the Malibu compound where the Band recorded and rehearsed in the ’70s. As Knopfler‘s taste for rootsy, country-influenced sounds became a growing presence in his solo work, he began working on material with singer Emmylou Harris, and their collaborative album, 2006’s All the Roadrunning, was recorded during sessions spread over seven years. Knopfler and Harris toured together in support of the set, and a live album, Real Live Roadrunning, came out later the same year. Knopfler continued to record at a steady pace, releasing Kill to Get Crimson in 2007 and Get Lucky in 2009, while still finding room to contribute to albums by Sonny Landreth, Bill Wyman, Diane Schuur, Bap Kennedy, and America. 2012 found Knopfler releasing Privateer, the first double-disc studio set of his career.

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